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February 26, 2009

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Lorraine...Nicoles Mom

Wow your memories brought me back...Jolly Roger and going to Mays for a shopping trip.....Do you remember Farmers Market? One of my favorites!

Carol Silva

It's so great to hear your comments. You've added to my memories. Thanks for taking the time to share what you love about Long Island - and in your case Gene - what your LEARNED to love about LI. Hard to believe, but I was went looking at colleges with my high school junior daughter yesterday. As we crossed the Throggs Neck Bridge she told me it would be exciting to go to school somewhere else, and even live in NYC and then Hawaii for a few years after graduation. But she couldn't see ultimately raising her own family anywhere but Long Island. I felt blessed to hear she's had the kind of childhood here that she'd like to repeat for her own children.
Be safe in the snow.
Carol Silva

Gene Durnet

When my parents transplanted me, my two bothers and sister from a three room apartment in Astoria to Commack in 1957, I was 12 years old. I hated every moment of of the transition from being a "city kid", where one could walk out the door of one's apartment and be greeted immediately by an age compatable pack of fellow baby boomers with a shared love of roller hockey, baseball, stickball, stoopball frequent trips to Astoria Park and it's massive swimming pool..
The year we moved to Commack, it consisted of a general store which doubled as a post office and the now long gone Commack Hotel on the corner of Commack Road and Jericho Turnpike...At the time, there were only 3,000 souls living in Commack, no schools (I was placed in the 6th grade in a building rented from the Local Baptist Church on Townline Road and the HS kids were transported to Hauppague). I was one of the oldest kids in my neighborhood, which mostly consisted of very young couples with toddlers in tow and many of whom were expecting baby number two or three.
Then it happened. Over the next five years the place exploded. From 3,000, population soared to 50,000 plus. Churchs, schools, shopping centers and many more homes were built in a seeming twinkling of an eye. The LI Arena was bulit and we had a home town hockey team to root for (first the "Rovers" and then the Ducks)...Little Leagues were formed. My mother learned to drive and joined the PTA. Mass was no longer held in the Mayfair Movie theatre but in our new parish church, Christ the King. Slowly but surely I began to identify with my new suburban home and came to learn what it meant to be a "Long Islander". I went to St. Anthony's Hs, then an all boys school located in San Remo and run by the Francisacn Bothers of Brooklyn. We borrowed the gym of the neighboring mental hospital (Kings Park) where we played our home basketball games with a very distictive "home field advantage" due to our unique "rooting section". I loved that school and the feeling of community engendered by the Brothers.
I met my wife, a girl who was actually born on LI and therefore unique in here persona of "native" Long Islander from Patchogue. We met at a summer theatre workshop at the newly established Suffolk County Community College, which, quelle suprise, was then housed in another former mental hospital/sanatorium...Her love of Long Island was deep and true. She introduced me to the wonders of Fire Island's "LEJA Beach, now Davis Park where she had spent all her summers growing up. We still continue to do so.
Forty years and two grown children later we are inveterate Long Islanders and can not concieve of a better place to live and raise a family. My kids and their kids as well as all of my siblings still call Long Island home and we wouldn't have it any other way.
Thanks for the opportunity to reminesce. Peace

SUSAN L.RUDNICK

CAROL: MY PARENTS MOVED TO AMITYVILLE IN THE EARLY 1950'S.I WAS FOUR YEARS OLD.WE LIVED ON A BLOCK WITH MANY FAMILIES OF LOCAL FIREMEN AND POLICEMEN.WE ROAD OUR BIKES IN THE STREET.WE JUMPED ROPE AND PLAYED HOP-SCOTCH ON THE SIDEWALKS.WE RAN AFTER THE GOOD HUMOR TRUCK EVERY NIGHT IN THE SUMMER MONTHS.WE WALKED OUR FAMILY DOGS AND CHATED WITH OUR NEIGHBORS OVER THE FENCE .SOME NEIGHBORS WHO RAISED CHICKENS WOULD GIVE US FRESH EGGS IN RETURN FOR BABYSITTING OR MOWING THE LAWN.WE WERE A VILLAGE COMMUNITY WITHIN A COMMUNITY.WE DIDNT HAVE EXPENSIVE TVS OR VIDEO GAMES TO KEEP US BUSY.WE PLAYED OUTDOORS ALL AFTERNOON DURING SCHOOL DAYS AND ALL DAY ON THE WEEKENDS.WE SHARED LUNCH TIME ON OUR FRONT OR BACK YARDS OF OUR NEIGHBORS.WE WERE ONE BIG FAMILY.WELLINGTON PLACE IN AMITYVILLE WAS HOME TO PROUD FAMILY NAMES SUCH AS POWELL AND SMITH.LIFE WAS SIMPLE ,FRIENDLY AND HAPPY;NOT FAST PACED AND IMPERSONAL AS IT IS TODAY.MY CURRENT DEVELOPMENT HAS MANY FIREMEN AND POLICEMEN AS WELL. THE NAMES SMITH AND PESCETELLI TO NAME A FEW.MY OLDER TWO CHILDREN WERE LUCKY ENOUGH TO HAVE EXPERIENED SOME OF WHAT I DID ON WELLINGTON PLACE.;MY OLDER TWO DID NOT.THE 80'S BROUGHT FAST PACED LIFE STYLES .HOPEFULLY THIS ECONOMIC SET BACK IS ACTUALLY A BLESSING IN DISGUISE! FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES ENJOYING EACH OTHER ! SUSAN L.RUDNICK

JR

Great memories Carol....brings back many similar moments for me

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